Baltimore Detective Sean Suitor update: no leads, no charges, but a huge gang broke some laws

What is “law enfarcement?”

Detective Sean Suitor had an important upcoming appointment: he was set to testify as a federal witness, and provide testimony against members of a huge criminal gang.

But one day before his testimony was due, a call came in, and he was sent off on a wild goose chase, to investigate a suspect that likely didnt exist.

Then, for some *unknown reason,* while pursuing that wild goose, he decided to shoot himself in the head in a vacant lot, with his own gun, as his “partner” chased that wild goose in a different direction.

Two years later, it was declared a suicide, with a questionable report by the coroner, and some trying to claim that Suitor himself was corrupt.

Oh, those impeccable coroners!

Oh, those massive, criminal gangs!

Then, a huge, even bigger gang of wild, lawless, flying geese descended on the neighborhood, and locked the neighborhood down for a week, kicked down doors without a warrant, wiretapped nearly every phone, shook down and arrested a few minor drug dealers, tried to “pin a rap” on some of them; took a few cars and computers, and leered at a six year old boy in the shower; but
not once did it occur to those gang members that maybe, they were looking at all the wrong suspects.

Because as is often repeated in the tens of thousands of online blogs about gang stalking, the goal of gang stalkers is to drive their target to “institutionalization, incarceration, or suicide.”

Read: Baltimore Detective was set to testify at police corruption trial
ROGS and others wonder: with hundreds of law enfarcement agents, the FBI, DEA, and many other federal agencies stalking that neighborhood, and wiretapping everyone in it, did it ever occur to them that maybe, just….maybe, they were barking at the wrong geese, and that the evidence they needed was on other cell phones, like, maybe, the cell phones of the corrupt cops and their associates that Det. Suitor was going to testify against?

Yeah: thats how bizarre and delusional gang stalking is. Because rational people would ALL make that link, and chase THAT lead.

But the massive gang that descended on that neighborhood missed that possibility somehow.

When Gang Stalkers Get Away With Murder

No-knock warrants, wiretaps, no leads: How the feds investigated a Baltimore neighborhood after Detective Suiter’s death

In April 2018, Baltimore prosecutors from the Major Investigations Unit obtained grand jury indictments against at least 10 people.

Olivis was one of them. He and others were charged with being part of a drug trafficking organization and faced conspiracy charges. Olivis said there was no evidence connecting him to such a conspiracy.

Their cases played out the way many in Baltimore are resolved: with a judge glancing over the facts and the sentencing guidelines, listening to defense attorneys plead their case, then extending an offer as a prosecutor stood silently.

Olivis didn’t want to deal. Tape of a bench conference — with the judge and lawyers for both sides — shows Olivis’ attorney saying she couldn’t figure out what the evidence against him was. The charges were later dropped.

But that was little consolation. Detectives impounded Olivis’ 2002 Lincoln Town Car during the raid on Frazier, his niece, even though the warrant against her did not mention Olivis or his vehicle.

He lost the car, he says, because after the Town Car was towed back to his neighborhood, police never returned the keys — and it was impounded a second time for a parking violation. He also lost his job with the school system.

“I’m trying to get my life back,” Olivis said in an interview. “I was fighting a case that never should’ve been put on me.”
The aftermath

Today, more than two years after Suiter was shot, records show that the intense policing efforts yielded nothing in the quest to solve his death, and little from the raids and surveillance.

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